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Lakers, LeBron top NBA sales as Giannis, Doncic rise

in World News

LeBron James and his Los Angeles Lakers remain the top moneyspinners in NBA jersey and team merchandise sales with Giannis Antetokounmpo and Luka Doncic reaching new popularity heights in 2019.

Figures announced Friday by the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) showed James and the Lakers atop the lists for the second consecutive year, based on online NBA Store sales from October through December 2019.

No purchase figures were given for any team, player or items.

James, a four-time NBA Most Valuable Player and three-time NBA champion, has paced jersey sales and kept the Lakers atop the team totals since leaving Cleveland for LA in July 2018.

James, …

Keep on reading: Lakers, LeBron top NBA sales as Giannis, Doncic rise

Local execs scramble to address water crisis in Basilan

in World News

Local execs scramble to address water crisis in Basilan

John Unson (Philstar.com) – January 18, 2020 – 4:02pm

COTABATO CITY, Philippines — Local officials are scrambling to address the shortage of water in Isabela City in Basilan, now affecting heavily-populated barangays in the area.

Irate residents and barangay officials are blaming past city officials and the Isabela Water District for the problem, for them a consequence of lack of foresight and in-depth projections of yearly increases in number of consumers and the accruing volume of needed supply each day.

House Deputy Speaker Mujiv Hataman said Saturday he convened on Thursday the barangay captains in Isabela City and presided over an urgent dialogue with the management of ISAWAD on how to resolve the issue.

While the water utility is not under the Isabela City local government unit, Mayor Sitti Djalia Turabin-Hataman and Vice Mayor Kifli Salliman, both first termers, have been trying to flex their ministerial powers to help address the issue.

Hataman, lone congressional representative of Basilan, has urged the manager of ISAWAD, Alelie Almodovar, to focus attention on the issue.

Like Isabela City’s newcomers mayor and vice mayor, the lawmaker was also elected only in May 2019.

Basilan Gov. Jim Salliman said he would task planners and engineers under his office to study the viability of harnessing potential sources of water in areas around Isabela City, which has more than 40 barangays.

Salliman had earlier urged police and Army units in Basilan to help the provincial government secure from loggers the rainforests in protected watershed areas in the province.

Local execs scramble to address water crisis in Basilan

in Metro Manila

Local execs scramble to address water crisis in Basilan

John Unson (Philstar.com) – January 18, 2020 – 4:02pm

COTABATO CITY, Philippines — Local officials are scrambling to address the shortage of water in Isabela City in Basilan, now affecting heavily-populated barangays in the area.

Irate residents and barangay officials are blaming past city officials and the Isabela Water District for the problem, for them a consequence of lack of foresight and in-depth projections of yearly increases in number of consumers and the accruing volume of needed supply each day.

House Deputy Speaker Mujiv Hataman said Saturday he convened on Thursday the barangay captains in Isabela City and presided over an urgent dialogue with the management of ISAWAD on how to resolve the issue.

While the water utility is not under the Isabela City local government unit, Mayor Sitti Djalia Turabin-Hataman and Vice Mayor Kifli Salliman, both first termers, have been trying to flex their ministerial powers to help address the issue.

Hataman, lone congressional representative of Basilan, has urged the manager of ISAWAD, Alelie Almodovar, to focus attention on the issue.

Like Isabela City’s newcomers mayor and vice mayor, the lawmaker was also elected only in May 2019.

Basilan Gov. Jim Salliman said he would task planners and engineers under his office to study the viability of harnessing potential sources of water in areas around Isabela City, which has more than 40 barangays.

Salliman had earlier urged police and Army units in Basilan to help the provincial government secure from loggers the rainforests in protected watershed areas in the province.

Read More Local execs scramble to address water crisis in Basilan

Photo Credit: Philippine Star

Dave Chappelle donates P1 million to Taal relief operations

in Latest News

American comedian Dave Chappelle did more than just dish jokes during his stay in the Philippines—he also contributed to aid for victims of the Taal Volcano eruption.

Chappelle donated P1 million to Rayomar Outreach Foundation, a nonprofit established by Rayomar Management Inc., which has companies in industries such as shipping and logistics. The comedian’s contribution was announced by venture capitalist Katrina Razon, the daughter of billionaire Enrique K. Razon, via Instagram on Thursday, Jan. 16.

Katrina was all praises for Chappelle, stating, “Dave not only sent audiences here into hysterics, he also demonstrated how kindness …

Keep on reading: Dave Chappelle donates P1 million to Taal relief operations

Tagaytay Art Beat postponed to a later date

in World News

“As a result of the ongoing volcanic activity of Taal Volcano,” organizers have postponed the much anticipated Tagaytay Art Beat music and arts festival scheduled for February 8 at Museo Orlina grounds in Tagaytay City.

In a post on its Facebook page Saturday morning, it was revealed that the venue, “Museo Orlina has been heavily affected by the catastrophe caused by the ongoing volcanic activities.”

“Tagaytay City, the town in which the museum is located, is currently placed under alert level 4. As a result, we are postponing Tagaytay Art Beat this February 8, 2020 to a later date which we hope to announce soon…We will be working hard to revert the situation as soon as the volcano is stable.”

Prior to the alarming volcanic activity of Taal, two waves of performers have already been announced including dance-rock outfit Autotelic, indie R&B/pop duo Ysanygo, indie-rock quintet Any Name’s Okay, renowned

Read More: https://businessmirror.com.ph/2020/01/18/tagaytay-art-beat-postponed-to-a-later-date/

Photo Credit: BusinessMirror

3 firms vie for Quezon, Laguna water project

in Latest News

A unit of Ayala Corp.’s Manila Water Co. Inc. is joining the race for a water supply project that will serve parts of Laguna and Quezon.

The PPP Center said three bidders were seeking to qualify for the 20-year Lumbo Spring Bulk Water Supply project.

It said Manila Water’s Laguna AAA Water Corp. partnered with Tubig Pilipinas Group Inc. The two other bidders were Quellwasser Development Corp. and Texin Inc.

The firms submitted eligibility documents to the San Pablo City Water District (SPCWD), which is implementing the project together with the Dolores Water District (DWD).

“The Joint Venture Selection Committee is now conducting detailed evaluation of the documents,” the PPP…

Keep on reading: 3 firms vie for Quezon, Laguna water project

Chelsea Logistics beefing up Ro-Ro fleet

in Latest News

Chelsea Logistics and Infrastructure Holdings Corp. announced the expansion of its roll-on, roll-off (Ro-Ro) fleet with the completion of a Japan-made vessel.

Chelsea Logistics, controlled by Davao-based businessman Dennis A. Uy, said in a stock exchange filing that its 97.78-meter M/V Starlite Venus, which could carry 740 passengers, 22 buses and six trucks, will arrive in the Philippines in April this year.

This is Chelsea Logistics’ 11th Ro-Ro passenger vessel made in Japan.

To date, the company has 22 Ro-Ro passenger vessels, 11 fast crafts, nine cargo ships, 16 tankers, 13 tugboats and two floating docks through its subsidiaries Chelsea Shipping Corp., Starlite Ferries Inc….

Keep on reading: Chelsea Logistics beefing up Ro-Ro fleet

‘Run silent, run deep’

in World News

THE Philippines has fixed its sights on the acquisition of Scorpène-class attack submarines from France in the next couple of years, a modernization project which, if consummated, would highlight the Philippine Navy’s capability upgrade program in the years to come.

The delivery of the underwater vessels, the first ever in the history of the Navy, would also automatically enlist the Philippines as one of the countries in the region that proudly flutters the submarine badge.

Scorpène-class Malaysian Navy submarine “Tun Razak” in the shipyard of Navantia-Cartagena (Spain) few days prior to its delivery.

“Wow, that would be great,” exclaimed Navy Flag Officer in Command Vice Admiral Robert Empedrad when informed of the progress of the submarine program and the idea of the Navy’s sailing and prowling Philippine waters with a submarine force.

In preparation for the planned procurement, the Navy is currently beefing up its stock of knowledge and skill

Read More: https://businessmirror.com.ph/2020/01/18/run-silent-run-deep/

Photo Credit: BusinessMirror

Multiple failures led to Iran’s accidental attack on jetliner

in World News

By Alan Levin / Bloomberg News

DETAILS about why Iran air defense forces mistook a Ukrainian airliner for a cruise missile remain murky, but one thing is clear: Safeguards for operating surface-to-air missiles are supposed to prevent that kind of mistaken identity and all of them failed.

The error, which killed all 176 people aboard the plane on Wednesday (January 8, 2020), is probably the result of multiple layers of failure that extend into high levels of the government and military, said Steven Zaloga, senior analyst for missile systems at the Teal Group.

“There’s any number of potential problems here,” Zaloga said. “This incident strongly suggests that the methodology has failed and the technology has failed as well. There should have been a methodology worked out to prevent fratricide.”

Iran has vowed to conduct a thorough investigation of what happened, and bring the “culprits” to justice. Among the questions that

Read More: https://businessmirror.com.ph/2020/01/18/multiple-failures-led-to-irans-accidental-attack-on-jetliner/

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Shift in Olympic philosophy

in World News
Athletes from Romania grab every opportunity for extra rest on the early train to the Ski Mountaineering competition at Villars Winter Park during The Winter Youth Olympic Games in Lausanne.

LAUSANNE, Switzerland—New ways of solving challenges for Olympic host cities are being tested this month at the Winter Youth Games in Lausanne.

Most athletes taking public transport to their venue.

Staging medal events in a neighboring country.

Creating cost-effective space for hundreds of more competitors with two phases of stays in the athlete village.

Officials from Paris, Milan and Los Angeles—the Olympic hosts from 2024 to 2028—would be wise paying attention to the project in the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) home city.

What works at the Youth OIympics often is picked up by future host cities. Especially since the 2014 Sochi Winter Games, tagged with $51 billion of Russian spending, helped to persuade voters to sink some potential bids and increased pressure from the IOC to drive down costs.

“If we can be just a small part of this [Olympic] history and we can help the system, I will be so proud,” Ian Logan, chief executive of Lausanne 2020, told The Associated Press.

Innovation is easier at a Youth Olympics, Logan acknowledged, because key influencers are more focused on the blockbuster Summer Games.

“There is maybe not so much pressure everywhere,” he said. “But that’s also the purpose of the Youth Games—to be a test bed of different things.”

The Youth Olympics’ role has shifted a little since the first summer edition in 2010 in Singapore.

A signature idea of Jacques Rogge’s 2001-13 presidency of the IOC, it was hoped to be elite competition for 14-to-18-year-olds. Also on the agenda were education in anti-doping and sporting values plus trials of new events.

Singapore’s staging of 3-on-3 basketball drove an urban trend that 10 years later sees it debut at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics alongside sports climbing and skateboarding.

Breakdancing began at the 2018 Buenos Aires Youth Olympics and was added to the 2024 Paris Games.

Not all events had elite lineups. Soccer in Singapore was a boys’ under-15 tournament. Bolivia, the gold medalist, and Montenegro represented the two strongest continents.

When Innsbruck, Austria, hosted the debut winter edition in 2012, 16-year-old Mikaela Shiffrin was already competitive in alpine skiing’s World Cup and had no need for junior races. The January slot, for Innsbruck and Lausanne, also clashes with the biggest alpine races in Austria and Switzerland.

“All the youths wanted to go to Kitzbuehel to watch, more than to compete at Innsbruck,” recalled Gian Franco Kasper, president of the International Ski Federation.

Kasper supports the Youth Olympics concept and a wider pool of potential medalists. Morocco won an alpine ski gold in 2012, and Israel has taken silver and bronze in Lausanne: “For them it is the greatest thing you can imagine,” he said.

One element of the inaugural games should not be repeated. It cost Singapore organizers close to $300 million—more than three times the original budget, and way over the IOC’s suggested $30 million.

Singapore’s IOC member, Ser Miang Ng, said those games, organized in two-and-a-half years, were “a starting point for subsequent games who can scale up, or scale down.”

The Lausanne Youth Olympics stayed within its $40-million budget during a five-year project when cutting costs and avoiding white elephant buildings became Olympic mantras.

Logan said a speed skating arena in Lausanne was dropped in favor of using the frozen lake at St. Moritz, almost six hours away by train.

Using the sliding track at St. Moritz also allowed the games to add bobsled, luge and skeleton. Athletes stay in a youth hostel there, Logan said.

A major shift in Olympic philosophy is detailed by these changes. And not just because the St. Moritz track is there waiting for the call to duty in 2026 from nearby Milan-Cortina d’Ampezzo in Italy.

When Tokyo bid and won in 2013, the strong—and expected—campaign promises included creating the special Olympic experience of living together for two weeks in the athlete village, which was close to most venues.

“If you do this, this is old-fashioned. Today we have to be clever,” said Logan, who is sending dozens of athletes into France for Nordic events.

A Lausanne legacy could be an athlete accommodation plan, in university housing, that creates space for hundreds of more competitors at no extra cost.

Instead of keeping all athletes on site for a two-week education program, many of the occupants in week one leave to make room for a second wave whose events start in week two.

Using that system at a Summer Games could increase the athlete quota limit of around 11,000 that prevents some sports and medal events from joining the program.

“It is very challenging,” Logan concedes. “The concept is really worth looking at.” AP

Read More: https://businessmirror.com.ph/2020/01/18/shift-in-olympic-philosophy/

Photo Credit: BusinessMirror

Olympic rings arrive in Tokyo

in World News

A worker is dwarfed by the Olympic rings on a barge in the Odaiba district of Tokyo.

TOKYO—The Olympic rings have arrived in Tokyo.

They sailed into Tokyo Bay on Friday on a barge and will stay there until the Olympics open on July 24 and close on August 9.

The blue, black, red, yellow, and green rings will be replaced after that by the symbol for the Paralympics Games, which open on August 25.

The symbol for the Paralympics is called “agitos,”which resembles three brush strokes in red, blue, and green. The word in Latin means “I move.”

The five Olympic rings are gigantic. They stand 15.3 meters high—about 50 feet tall—and are 32.6 meters from end to end—about 100 feet in length.

“We decided to install the Olympic rings at this time because we wanted to do it first thing in the

Read More: https://businessmirror.com.ph/2020/01/18/olympic-rings-arrive-in-tokyo/

Photo Credit: BusinessMirror

Australian Open organizers defend playing despite poor quality of air

in World News
Belarusian Aryna Sabalenka hides under her towel during a break against Ukrainian Dayana Yastremska during their Adelaide International match on Friday.

MELBOURNE, Australia—Australian Open tournament director Craig Tiley defended the decision to hold qualifying matches this week even though Melbourne’s air quality was among the worst in the world because of smoke from wildfires devastating parts of the country.

The tournament has drawn criticism from players for contesting matches in conditions that led one, Dalila Jakupovic, to collapse to her knees while coughing heavily, and another, Bernard Tomic, to seek medical attention because of trouble breathing.

Tiley said Thursday the conditions were under a threshold set after Australian Open organizers consulted with sports and medical experts, and scientists from the Environmental Protection Authority.

“Our medical team were satisfied with the conditions that the players were competing in, per all of the research and the data and the science that they have,” Tiley said.

He said matches would have been stopped if medical staff at Melbourne Park decided it was too unhealthy to keep playing.

“Absolutely, we understand the anger, [but]a lot of it comes from the confusion and the complexity of understanding what goes on,” Tiley said. “We’ve invited the players…to come in at any time to have a conversation.

“If anyone at any time is feeling not well, we have a full medical team. We have a respiratory specialist on hand to deal with any of these issues.”

Qualifying matches were delayed for an hour on Tuesday and two hours on Wednesday until smoke and haze from the regional wildfires cleared enough to allow play to proceed. Rain late Wednesday improved the air quality in Melbourne.

British player Liam Broady was critical Thursday of the playing conditions he dealt with Tuesday in a 6-3, 6-0 qualifying loss to 131st-ranked Ilya Ivashka of Belarus.

“The more I think about the conditions we played in…the more it boils my blood,” Broady posted on Twitter. “We can’t let this slide. The e-mail we received yesterday from the ATP [Association of Tennis Professionals] and [Australian Open] was a slap in the face, conditions were ‘playable.’ Were they healthy?”

Broady, who finished last year ranked No. 240, said people in Melbourne were advised to keep their pets indoors on the day he played, “and yet we were expected to go outside for high intensity physical competition?”

On Wednesday, Canadian qualifier Brayden Schnur was critical of officials after his first-round win over Sebastian Ofner, and said stars such as Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal should be more outspoken about playing conditions.

The ATP player council is set to meet before the Australian Open, which begins Monday. AP

Image Credits: AP

Australian Open organizers defend playing despite poor quality of air

in World News

Belarusian Aryna Sabalenka hides under her towel during a break against Ukrainian Dayana Yastremska during their Adelaide International match on Friday.

MELBOURNE, Australia—Australian Open tournament director Craig Tiley defended the decision to hold qualifying matches this week even though Melbourne’s air quality was among the worst in the world because of smoke from wildfires devastating parts of the country.

The tournament has drawn criticism from players for contesting matches in conditions that led one, Dalila Jakupovic, to collapse to her knees while coughing heavily, and another, Bernard Tomic, to seek medical attention because of trouble breathing.

Tiley said Thursday the conditions were under a threshold set after Australian Open organizers consulted with sports and medical experts, and scientists from the Environmental Protection Authority.

“Our medical team were satisfied with the conditions that the players were competing in, per all

Read More: https://businessmirror.com.ph/2020/01/18/australian-open-organizers-defend-playing-despite-poor-quality-of-air/

Photo Credit: BusinessMirror

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